Marcia

Marcia

I am a misunderstood person who takes life very very seriously. I’m a very inspirational and spiritual being who believes truly in faith and good practice to your fellow man.”
Marcia was born in Clarendon, Jamaica, in a little village called Jericho – the land of oranges and red dirt. She was brought up by her grandmother, Elizabeth Smith, who was a hard working, loving individual who Marcia still sees as her mother.

“My early years were the happiest years of my life, as I remember holding my slingshot as I aimed at whatever bird was in the top of the tree,” reminisces Marcia “I could never let go, I could only aim.”
Marcia learned about giving, family life and true community spirit, not necessarily meaning blood relatives, but the extension of your family within the community. “I learned to have respect for my elders, which was good grounding for the start of a very challenging experience when I arrived in Britain at the age of 10.”
Upon reaching the UK, without understanding what her destiny was really about, Marcia found herself interviewed on the BBC by a gentlemen by the name of Tom Coyne, leading into singing a very well known anthem from back home called “Carry me Ackee go Linstead Market” accompanied by a family member, Hope Howard, on the guitar.
After a very turbulent upbringing, which resulted in Marcia running away from home on many occasions, she took control of her own life at the tender age of 17 when she left home. Prior to that, she wrote a film titled “The Devil’s Bubbletrap” and showed a keen interest in the arts. This was not picked up and Marcia went into nursing, soon discovering this was far too emotional for her.
In 1980 Marcia started off in the wonderful world of Advertising and Media Sales and developed her skills having worked for a number of organisations such as the Leisure Circle Book Club, Chamber of Commerce Publications, Thompsons Directory, What’s On Magazine and the Evening Mail, which was part of the Mirror Group.
“This was where I started my first publication, The Enterprise (boldly going where no man has gone before). It was the start of the realisation that I had a purpose to make change and a difference in peoples lives. With the media being the most powerful tool, this was the start of my journey to publish positive news and highlight the best in all communities in order to break down barriers caused by ignorance.”
By this time, Marcia had had a son and was concerned about the negative news in the press that surrounded people of colour. “I actually thought I could change peoples perceptions by giving them a vehicle by which they could get to understand a little about their neighbour, so they would not be ill-advised.”
Marcia was never a business woman, and found the interim parts very challenging. “Doing business straight is a challenge in itself, because not everybody’s minds and intentions are the same. If you truly believe in what you do, and that all things are possible, you can achieve against all odds.”
After running The Enterprise for a total of 13 years, Marcia decided to launch The Phoenix Newspaper after a near death experience when she discovered that she had diabetes. “I decided that I had to leave a legacy whereby young people get the opportunity to write their own story, in a time where communication is at its peak.”
So at the age of 50, The Phoenix Newspaper was born, rising from the ashes as a way of showing young people that they can and will succeed if they get the support, guidance, love and attention needed to secure their footing in a steadfast place. “History begins everyday, and The Phoenix Newspaper is my contribution to the young